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What happens during a reflexology session?

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Many reflexologists begin by gently smoothing oil or cream on your feet. Next, they'll put mild to moderate pressure on one foot at a time using different techniques. They might return to certain pressure points a second time, but they'll cover the entire area during the session, not just the points connected to any trouble spots you might have. Sessions are usually 30 or 60 minutes long.

From: What Is Reflexology? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : “The Physiological and Biochemical Outcomes Associated with a Reflexology Treatment: A Systematic Review,” “Reflexology versus Swedish Massage to Reduce Physiologic Stress and Pain and Improve Mood in Nursing Home Residents with Cancer: A Pilot Trial.”

University of Minnesota: “How Does Reflexology Work?” “What Is the History of Reflexology?” “What Are Reflexology Points and Areas?” “How Can I Find a Reflexology Therapist?” “What Can I Expect in a First Reflexology Visit?” “Are There Times When I Shouldn’t Have Reflexology?”

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: "Reflexology."

International Institute of Reflexology: "About Reflexology."

Reflexology Association of America: "Definition of Reflexology."

Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice : “The effects of foot reflexology massage on anxiety in patients following coronary artery bypass graft surgery: a randomized controlled trial.”

Journal of Advanced Nursing : “Effectiveness of reflexology on anxiety of patients undergoing cardiovascular interventional procedures: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.”

Iranian Red Crescent Medical Journal: “ The Effect of Reflexology on Pain Intensity and Duration of Labor on Primiparas.”

Iranian Journal of Nursing and Midwifery Research : “Comparing the effects of reflexology and relaxation on fatigue in women with multiple sclerosis.”

Multiple Sclerosis : “Reflexology treatment relieves symptoms of multiple sclerosis: a randomized controlled study.”

Palliative Medicine : “Aromatherapy, massage and reflexology: A systematic review and thematic synthesis of the perspectives from people with palliative care needs.”

Complementary Therapies in Medicine: “Effect of self-administered foot reflexology for symptom management in healthy persons: a systematic review and meta-analysis.”

Reflexology Today, the Journal of the American Reflexology Certification Board : “How to Quickly Release Stress in Less Than Five Minutes.”

American Reflexology Certification Board.

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on August 14, 2019

SOURCES:

Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : “The Physiological and Biochemical Outcomes Associated with a Reflexology Treatment: A Systematic Review,” “Reflexology versus Swedish Massage to Reduce Physiologic Stress and Pain and Improve Mood in Nursing Home Residents with Cancer: A Pilot Trial.”

University of Minnesota: “How Does Reflexology Work?” “What Is the History of Reflexology?” “What Are Reflexology Points and Areas?” “How Can I Find a Reflexology Therapist?” “What Can I Expect in a First Reflexology Visit?” “Are There Times When I Shouldn’t Have Reflexology?”

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: "Reflexology."

International Institute of Reflexology: "About Reflexology."

Reflexology Association of America: "Definition of Reflexology."

Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice : “The effects of foot reflexology massage on anxiety in patients following coronary artery bypass graft surgery: a randomized controlled trial.”

Journal of Advanced Nursing : “Effectiveness of reflexology on anxiety of patients undergoing cardiovascular interventional procedures: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.”

Iranian Red Crescent Medical Journal: “ The Effect of Reflexology on Pain Intensity and Duration of Labor on Primiparas.”

Iranian Journal of Nursing and Midwifery Research : “Comparing the effects of reflexology and relaxation on fatigue in women with multiple sclerosis.”

Multiple Sclerosis : “Reflexology treatment relieves symptoms of multiple sclerosis: a randomized controlled study.”

Palliative Medicine : “Aromatherapy, massage and reflexology: A systematic review and thematic synthesis of the perspectives from people with palliative care needs.”

Complementary Therapies in Medicine: “Effect of self-administered foot reflexology for symptom management in healthy persons: a systematic review and meta-analysis.”

Reflexology Today, the Journal of the American Reflexology Certification Board : “How to Quickly Release Stress in Less Than Five Minutes.”

American Reflexology Certification Board.

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on August 14, 2019

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