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What is acupressure?

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Used for thousands of years in China, acupressure is based on the same principles as acupuncture to promote relaxation and wellness and to treat disease. Shiatsu is a Japanese form of acupressure.

Traditional Chinese medical theory describes meridians, invisible channels in your body that carry energy called qi (ch'i). They begin at your fingertips and connect to your brain and then an organ or networks of organs to create a communication system. When one of these meridians is blocked or out of balance, you get sick. Acupressure uses specific points along these meridians to help restore balance.

Western practitioners may say results come from things like reduced muscle tension, improved circulation, or the release of endorphins, which are natural pain relievers.

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Acupressure, Shiatsu, and Other Asian Bodywork."

American Pain Foundation: "Treatment Options: A Guide for People Living with Pain."

Memorial Sloan Kettering: Acupressure

Memorial Sloan Kettering: Cancer

NIH NCCAM: "Energy Medicine: An Overview."

Natural Standard: ''Acupressure, shiatsu, tuina,'' 2013.

 

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on October 16, 2019

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Acupressure, Shiatsu, and Other Asian Bodywork."

American Pain Foundation: "Treatment Options: A Guide for People Living with Pain."

Memorial Sloan Kettering: Acupressure

Memorial Sloan Kettering: Cancer

NIH NCCAM: "Energy Medicine: An Overview."

Natural Standard: ''Acupressure, shiatsu, tuina,'' 2013.

 

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on October 16, 2019

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