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What is the theory behind natural colon cleansing?

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One of the main theories behind colon cleansing is an ancient belief called the theory of autointoxication. This is the belief that undigested meat and other foods cause mucus buildup in the colon. This buildup produces toxins, the theory goes, which enter the blood's circulation, poisoning the body. Some people claim these toxins cause a wide range of symptoms, such as:

On the surface, the idea of toxins being reabsorbed by the body makes some sense. After all, rectal suppositories are used to rapidly administer drugs, but the whole theory of autointoxication has been disproven.

  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Weight gain
  • Low energy

SOURCES:

Horne, S. 2006; vol. 6(2): pp. 93-100. Journal of Herbal Pharmacotherapy,

American Cancer Society: Colon Therapy."

Baptist Health Systems: "Colon Cleansing: Don't Be Misled by the Claims."

Natural Standard.

International Association for Colon Hydrotherapy

U.S. National Library of Medicine: "Soluble vs. insoluble fiber.:

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on October 25, 2017

SOURCES:

Horne, S. 2006; vol. 6(2): pp. 93-100. Journal of Herbal Pharmacotherapy,

American Cancer Society: Colon Therapy."

Baptist Health Systems: "Colon Cleansing: Don't Be Misled by the Claims."

Natural Standard.

International Association for Colon Hydrotherapy

U.S. National Library of Medicine: "Soluble vs. insoluble fiber.:

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on October 25, 2017

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What is the goal of natural colon cleansing?

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