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  • Question 1/15

    Which of these can you find inside a tear?

  • Answer 1/15

    Which of these can you find inside a tear?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Tears aren’t just water. The liquid layers that make up tears are a lot more like saliva. There’s a lot swimming around in there, including oily lipids, metabolites, electrolytes, enzymes, and even hormones.

  • Question 1/15

    Tears help you see.

  • Answer 1/15

    Tears help you see.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Without tears constantly hanging out around (and all over) your eyes, you wouldn’t be able to see clearly. The outer oily layer of your tears not only keeps your eye moist so it keeps working right, but it also gives the outer surface of your eye a smooth area to look through.

  • Question 1/15

    Tears that spill out in response to joy, sadness, or fear are called:

  • Answer 1/15

    Tears that spill out in response to joy, sadness, or fear are called:

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    They’re sometimes called psychic tears. Your brain tells your tear glands to start cranking them out when you feel certain emotions. As a kid, physical pain triggers them, too. When you get older, that happens less and more emotions make you well up. They can include sympathy, morality, and compassion.

  • Answer 1/15

    Emotional tears are different than other tears because:

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    The liquid that leaks out when you watch a sad movie may have proteins and hormones you won’t find in tears that fall when eyes are simply watering. Scientists aren’t sure why. They think it may have something to do with your body trying to get back in balance after emotional stress.

  • Question 1/15

    If you cry during a movie, are you more likely to feel better or worse after it’s over?

  • Answer 1/15

    If you cry during a movie, are you more likely to feel better or worse after it’s over?

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    • Correct Answer:

    A tear-jerker may leave you feeling drained right after the credits roll. But some research shows that about an hour and a half later, you’re likely not only to recover, but feel better than you did just before the opening scene.

  • Question 1/15

    If you find your tears spilling out but your mood hasn't changed, it’s likely that:

  • Answer 1/15

    If you find your tears spilling out but your mood hasn't changed, it’s likely that:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    They're called reflex tears, and they crop up anytime something outside your body is bugging your eyes. Your eye’s normal moisture goes into overdrive to wash away irritants like smoke, an eyelash, or fumes from the onions you’re chopping for dinner.

  • Answer 1/15

    If you cry freely and often, it most likely means that:

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    • Correct Answer:

    Keep people at arm’s length? You’re less likely to cry and more likely to stifle tears when you get the urge to. If you have close relationships, there’s a better chance your crying is healthy and normal. If you’re too attached to people (a.k.a. “clingy”), you may cry at the drop of a hat, too. But it can be harder to stop.

  • Question 1/15

    Babies who cry for a while before falling asleep may snooze:

  • Answer 1/15

    Babies who cry for a while before falling asleep may snooze:

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    • Correct Answer:

    Experts studied 43 infants whose parents let them cry for set periods of time before falling asleep. They found that the babies woke up fewer times during the night and slept more deeply after their crying sessions. They measured the baby’s stress levels and found them about the same as babies who did not cry before sleeping.

  • Question 1/15

    Women cry more than men.

  • Answer 1/15

    Women cry more than men.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It’s not a one-size-fits-all fact. Still, in a worldwide study, women shed tears an average of three to four times as much as men per month. Women tend to cry more intensely during each sob session, too.

  • Question 1/15

    In the U.S., how many times a month does an average man cry?

  • Answer 1/15

    In the U.S., how many times a month does an average man cry?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It's actually about 1.9 times. Women average about 3.5. When you compare these numbers to other countries, they’re on the high end. Men in Bulgaria report letting the tears flow only 0.3 times a month.

  • Question 1/15

    One way tears protect you is they’re:

  • Answer 1/15

    One way tears protect you is they’re:

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    Like most of the fluids in your body, tears have molecules that help prevent the spread of many bacteria, viruses, and fungi. They’re part of your body’s first line of defense against germs.

  • Question 1/15

    Crying flushes out your eyes and also your:

  • Answer 1/15

    Crying flushes out your eyes and also your:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Tears are made in your tear glands and drain through your tear ducts. Those ducts connect to the inside of your nose. So as the fluid exits, it often goes through your nostrils. It’s why you tend to get snotty when you sob.

  • Question 1/15

    The act of crying always brings stress relief.

  • Answer 1/15

    The act of crying always brings stress relief.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Sometimes a cry can be cathartic. But it really depends on why you’re crying and who you’re around when you do. If you have good support when you cry, it’s likely you’ll feel like it helped. But if you try to keep your tears in, or others’ reactions make you feel shame for crying, it may not ease things at all.

  • Question 1/15

    Certain chemicals in women’s tears may make men:

  • Answer 1/15

    Certain chemicals in women’s tears may make men:

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    • Correct Answer:

    Scientists say your tears can work as a “chemosignal” that subtly affects the people around you. Using MRI, experts looked at the brains of men who had just gotten a whiff of female tears and saw the activity in the section that controls sexual arousal went down. Sniffing the scent of women’s tears also appears to lower testosterone in men, too.

  • Question 1/15

    Crying helps your body clear out toxins.

  • Answer 1/15

    Crying helps your body clear out toxins.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Watering eyes help keep out dust, debris, and other irritations. Scientists think tears of emotion may get rid of toxins inside your body, too. Studies are ongoing, but emotional tears are full of stress hormones and other chemicals, so they leave the body every time you cry.

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    Dry those eyes and try again. Soon you’ll be crying tears of high-score joy.

Sources | Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on April 13, 2018 Medically Reviewed on April 13, 2018

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on
April 13, 2018

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

  1. Getty

 

SOURCES:

American Academy of Ophthalmology: “Facts About Tears,” “All About Emotional Tears.”

Motivation and Emotion: “Why crying does and sometimes does not seem to alleviate mood: a quasi-experimental study.”

Pediatrics: “Behavioral Interventions for Infant Sleep Problems: A Randomized Controlled Trial.”

Cognition and Emotion: “Crying and Mood Change.”

Experimental Eye Research: “Antimicrobial Compounds in Tears.”

Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology: “When is Crying Cathartic? An International Study.”

Mayo Clinic: “Blocked Tear Duct.”

Science: “Human Tears Contain a Chemosignal.”

Frontiers in Psychology: “Is crying a self-soothing behavior?”

American Psychological Association: “Why We Cry.”

Social Behavior and Personality: “Individual Differences in Adult Crying: the Role of Attachment Styles.”

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.