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  • Question 1/15

    What part of your body works overtime when you constantly work overtime?

  • Answer 1/15

    What part of your body works overtime when you constantly work overtime?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Sudden stress, like the kind you have after narrowly avoiding a fender bender, triggers a part of your brain called the hypothalamus. It sends signals that tell your adrenal glands to flood your body with cortisol and epinephrine. Those hormones rev your body up for “fight or flight.” Low-level, constant stress keeps your body pumping out those hormones in a steady stream. So you stay on high alert, even if you’re not in physical danger. 

  • Question 1/15

    If you have an unhealthy addiction to work, you’re also more likely to have:

  • Answer 1/15

    If you have an unhealthy addiction to work, you’re also more likely to have:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    There’s a strong link between workaholics and things like ADHD, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), anxiety, and depression. It’s likely that having these disorders makes you prone to working too much. You may use work to avoid depression, or you may work more because your ADHD, OCD, or anxiety won’t let you stop. Likewise, stress can affect your mental well-being and lead to symptoms of anxiety and depression.

  • Question 1/15

    If stress hormones hang out in your body for a long time, they can:

  • Answer 1/15

    If stress hormones hang out in your body for a long time, they can:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Chronic stress may raise your chances for heart attacks and strokes by raising plaque buildup that clogs your arteries. You’re also more likely to have high blood pressure. You might think stress would sharpen your senses. It actually dulls them over time. It’s also no weight-loss plan: High cortisol levels make your body hang on to fat. That can lead to extra pounds.

  • Question 1/15

    If you’re not leaving time in your schedule for exercise, you’re at a higher risk of:

  • Answer 1/15

    If you’re not leaving time in your schedule for exercise, you’re at a higher risk of:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Exercise is one of the best ways to prevent disease. If you’re glued to an office chair (or seat of a vehicle) all day, and you’re not offsetting that stillness with some muscle movement, you’re really raising your chance of some kind of health problem, whether it’s heart-related, cancer-related, or something else entirely.

  • Question 1/15

    You’re more likely to get sick when you’re putting in long hours on the job.

  • Answer 1/15

    You’re more likely to get sick when you’re putting in long hours on the job.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Burning your candle at both ends can wear you down, but it also weakens your immune system. The result? You’re less protected from germs that come your way. The older you get, the more prone you are to stress-related immune changes, too.

  • Answer 1/15

    The best definition of a workaholic is someone who:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    There’s a difference between being drawn to your work and being controlled by it. Workaholism can be like an addiction. When you’re a workaholic, you have a hard time keeping a good quality of life because of your obsession with work. Your job often doesn’t satisfy you. You also may not be productive, even though you’re putting in extra hours.

  • Question 1/15

    You’re more likely to be a workaholic if you’re:

  • Answer 1/15

    You’re more likely to be a workaholic if you’re:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Studies say the things that can make you a workaholic include:

    • Being in charge of other employees
    • Working for yourself
    • Being a younger adult

     

    Workaholism is also more likely to affect you if you have a higher education.

  • Question 1/15

    Chronic stress can affect you in the bathroom by giving you:

  • Answer 1/15

    Chronic stress can affect you in the bathroom by giving you:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Being swamped and stressed all the time can do a number on your digestive system. It makes a difference in how quickly (or slowly) things move through your system. That means you can either be stopped up or sprinting for the bathroom. Stress can also keep your body from taking in the nutrients you need from the food you eat.

  • Question 1/15

    The headaches you get from a hectic schedule are typically caused by:

  • Answer 1/15

    The headaches you get from a hectic schedule are typically caused by:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    The stress that comes with keeping your nose to the grindstone tenses up your muscles, which can bring all kinds of side effects. You might grind your teeth, have sore shoulders, or deal with a stiff neck. You’re likely to get headaches from all this muscle tightness. It may even trigger migraines.

  • Question 1/15

    Women who work more than 60 hours a week _______ their risk of cancer, diabetes, heart problems, and other conditions.

  • Answer 1/15

    Women who work more than 60 hours a week _______ their risk of cancer, diabetes, heart problems, and other conditions.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Studies show women who carry a big workload often do so on top of many tasks at home. So their health risks tend to run higher than men’s. Women are three times as likely to get cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and other conditions if they work 60-plus hours most weeks. Those odds start going up once you pass 40 hours. They jump again after you pass 50 hours a week.

  • Answer 1/15

    Burnout is caused by:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Burnout is real, and it happens when stress piles up to a level you can’t deal with anymore. Long hours of work and a calendar that's too full can cause it. You may be headed to burnout if you:

    • Feel tired all the time
    • Spend most of your day doing tasks that feel overwhelming or boring
    • Feel underappreciated
    • Think most days are bad days
  • Question 1/15

    Overworking tires you out, which helps you sleep.

  • Answer 1/15

    Overworking tires you out, which helps you sleep.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    There may be a link between sleep problems and workaholism. Even though your work pace may make you feel sleepy when you should be awake, you’re more likely to have problems falling asleep or getting good-quality sleep once you do.

  • Question 1/15

    Which of these, taken regularly, improves your work performance, mood, and health?

  • Answer 1/15

    Which of these, taken regularly, improves your work performance, mood, and health?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Taking breaks from work, whether it’s short stints during your workday or days and weeks away from the office, can boost your well-being. The benefits are especially high if you spend that time doing physical activity, learning something new, or practicing relaxation so your body can fully recover from the stress at work.

  • Question 1/15

    Stress causes stomach ulcers.

  • Answer 1/15

    Stress causes stomach ulcers.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You aren’t likely to get an ulcer because of a busy, stressful schedule. But if you have an ulcer, it may get worse. Most ulcers are caused by a germ called H. pylori.

  • Question 1/15

    Staying stressed can hurt your chances of having children.

  • Answer 1/15

    Staying stressed can hurt your chances of having children.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Stress hormones can mess with your reproductive system. In men, it can curb sperm production and lower testosterone levels. Women can have irregular cycles and less sexual desire when their bodies are swamped with stress.

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    You’re a quiz whiz! You deserve some relaxing downtime after that stellar score.

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    Total burnout. Take a break from your schedule to learn a little more about how being busy as a bee might be harming your health.

Sources | Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on March 09, 2018 Medically Reviewed on March 09, 2018

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on
March 09, 2018

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

  1. Thinkstock Photos

 

SOURCES:

Harvard Health: “Understanding the stress response.”

PLoS One: “Daily sitting time and all-cause mortality: a meta-analysis,” “The Relationships between Workaholism and Symptoms of Psychiatric Disorders: A Large-Scale Cross-Sectional Study.”

American Psychological Association: “Stress Weakens the Immune System.”

American Psychiatric Association: “Working too Much: Hard Worker or Workaholic?”

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health: “Association between workaholism and sleep problems among hospital nurses.”

The American Institute of Stress: “Stress Effects.”

The Ohio State University: “Women’s long work hours linked to alarming increases in cancer, heart disease.”

Womenshealth.gov: “Stress and your health.”

Organizational Dynamics: “Embracing Work Breaks.”

Helpguide.org: “Burnout Prevention and Treatment.”

National Institutes of Health: "Stress and the HPA Axis."

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.