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  • Question 1/12

    This may help get rid of dandruff, clear up acne, and wipe out athlete’s foot.

  • Answer 1/12

    This may help get rid of dandruff, clear up acne, and wipe out athlete’s foot.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Prescription or over-the-counter medications may work better and faster, but rubbing tea tree oil on your skin can help with several different conditions, mostly skin issues. Don't ever swallow it, though -- it can be toxic.

  • Question 1/12

    Chamomile can help soothe an upset stomach.

  • Answer 1/12

    Chamomile can help soothe an upset stomach.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    While some studies show that a mixture of herbs that includes chamomile might help kids’ upset tummies, chamomile alone doesn’t have that effect.

  • Question 1/12

    What might echinacea do for you?

  • Answer 1/12

    What might echinacea do for you?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Once a cold hits, echinacea can’t do much. But if you take it before you get sick, you may have a small chance of preventing one in the first place. Note: Washing your hands often is an even better way to do that.

  • Question 1/12

    What’s in your pantry that can help protect scraped skin from bacteria?

  • Answer 1/12

    What’s in your pantry that can help protect scraped skin from bacteria?

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    • Correct Answer:

    A smear of honey on your skin also can keep bacteria from growing and helps you heal faster. It may even help prevent scarring.

  • Question 1/12

    Ginkgo biloba boosts your memory.

  • Answer 1/12

    Ginkgo biloba boosts your memory.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    For most adults, it’s safe to take, but there’s no evidence it helps with anything related to your health, including your brain.

  • Question 1/12

    Green tea may lower the risk of heart disease by helping with:

  • Answer 1/12

    Green tea may lower the risk of heart disease by helping with:

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    • Correct Answer:

    This may be thanks to chemicals called catechins that help defend plants from radiation and other harmful things. Brewed green tea is rich in them (black tea has them too, just not as many). The caffeine in tea also may make you more alert, and the FDA has stamped its OK on ointments that use a green tea extract to treat genital warts.

  • Question 1/12

    Cinnamon can help with this condition:

  • Answer 1/12

    Cinnamon can help with this condition:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    There’s lots of research on cinnamon as a natural remedy, but so far, no big studies have shown that it helps with any specific medical problem.

  • Question 1/12

    Peppermint oil might help with:

  • Answer 1/12

    Peppermint oil might help with:

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    • Correct Answer:

    Some studies have shown that rubbing it on your temples may ease this kind of headache. Peppermint also may help with indigestion and some symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

  • Question 1/12

    To help keep your blood sugar steady, you might reach for:

  • Answer 1/12

    To help keep your blood sugar steady, you might reach for:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    A tablespoon of vinegar in a glass of water before a meal may help keep your blood glucose under control. Don’t do this more than twice a day, though -- too much can bother your stomach and wear away the enamel on your teeth. A better idea might be to use it as part of a salad dressing.

  • Question 1/12

    If you take birth control pills, you shouldn’t take:

  • Answer 1/12

    If you take birth control pills, you shouldn’t take:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It can keep the pill from working as well as it should. This plant-based supplment can affect how well other medicines work, too, including antidepressants, blood thinners, and some heart, cancer, and HIV medications.

  • Question 1/12

    If you’re going through menopause, ginseng might help with:

  • Answer 1/12

    If you’re going through menopause, ginseng might help with:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Research shows ginseng can boost your mood during menopause. But there’s no proof it helps with hot flashes or bloating.

  • Question 1/12

    Some women say black cohosh can help treat:

  • Answer 1/12

    Some women say black cohosh can help treat:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    This plant seems to cool things off for some women during menopause. The science behind it is still hazy, though.

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Sources | Reviewed by Carmen Patrick Mohan on June 07, 2017 Medically Reviewed on June 07, 2017

Reviewed by Carmen Patrick Mohan on
June 07, 2017

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1) JanPietruszka / Thinkstock

Iranian Journal of Basic Medical Sciences : “Traditional and Modern Uses of Natural Honey in Human Diseases: A Review.”

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: “Black Cohosh,” “Green Tea,” “Chamomile,” “Echinacea,” “St. John’s Wort,” “Ginkgo,” “Cinnamon,” “Peppermint Oil.”

The North American Menopause Society: “Natural Remedies for Hot Flashes.”

Harvard Health Publications: “Green tea may lower heart disease risk.”

Medscape: “Vinegar and Diabetes: Dos and Don'ts.”

Journal of Diabetes Research : “Vinegar Consumption Increases Insulin-Stimulated Glucose Uptake by the Forearm Muscle in Humans with Type 2 Diabetes.”

Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity: “Plant polyphenols as dietary antioxidants in human health and disease.”

Phytomedicine: International Journal of Phytotherapy and Phytopharmocology : “Virucidal effect of peppermint oil on the enveloped viruses herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 in vitro.”

Clinical Microbiology Reviews : “Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree) Oil: a Review of Antimicrobial and Other Medicinal Properties.”

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.