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  • Answer 1/11

    Why does it feel good to laugh?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Laughter gives you a natural high. It lights up the reward center of your brain and releases feel-good chemicals, including dopamine and endorphins. This is the same thing that triggers the feeling people get from some drugs. It may be behind the “high” joggers feel after a good run, too.

  • Answer 1/11

    In social situations, we use laughter to:

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    • Correct Answer:

    It isn’t always tied to jokes or humor. People sometimes laugh even when nothing is funny. Scientists say we use it to connect with others or show we understand them. Fun fact: You’re 30 times more likely to laugh when you’re with others than when you’re alone.

  • Question 1/11

    How many calories can 10 to 15 minutes of laughing burn?

  • Answer 1/11

    How many calories can 10 to 15 minutes of laughing burn?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Researchers found that it raises your heart rate 10% to 20%. If you chortle for 15 minutes every day, you could laugh off 4 pounds in a year.

  • Answer 1/11

    How might laughter help your heart?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Scientists think it releases endorphins that latch onto receptors in your blood vessels. This triggers them to release nitric oxide, which loosens up your arteries. Relaxed arteries are more flexible and wider, so blood flows freely.

  • Question 1/11

    Laughing might help ease pain.

  • Answer 1/11

    Laughing might help ease pain.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It releases brain chemicals called endorphins that may help you deal with pain better. That may be especially helpful for older adults who have chronic pain. One study followed two groups of seniors -- one got “humor therapy” sessions and the other didn’t. The humor group told jokes and shared funny stories for an hour a week. After 8 weeks, those people said they had less pain than those who didn’t get the therapy.

  • Question 1/11

    Laughter may help with which mental health problem(s)?

  • Answer 1/11

    Laughter may help with which mental health problem(s)?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Research shows that a good chuckle may lower stress hormones like cortisol and epinephrine and raise serotonin -- a brain chemical that helps fight depression.

  • Question 1/11

    Laughter is contagious.

  • Answer 1/11

    Laughter is contagious.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Scientists think humans may have a built-in “laugh detector” -- a brain circuit that only responds to the sound of laughter. Once you hear it, your laugh generator is tripped, and you get the giggles too.

  • Question 1/11

    A baby first giggles at this age:

  • Answer 1/11

    A baby first giggles at this age:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Smiling, laughing, and tickling are great ways for parents to bond with their babies. They get to know one another, and babies learn all about laughter from watching and responding.

  • Answer 1/11

    When did early humans laugh?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It’s thought that our early ancestors began laughing millions of years before they could talk. It may have been an early way to communicate or figure out if strangers were friends or foes. Humans also might have used it as a “sigh of relief” after danger passed.

  • Question 1/11

    Uncontrollable laughter can be a problem for people who have:

  • Answer 1/11

    Uncontrollable laughter can be a problem for people who have:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    This and other disorders related to your nervous system can affect how your brain controls emotions. This is called the pseudobulbar affect (PBA). People with it may burst out crying or laughing for no reason. Medication can help.

  • Question 1/11

    What movie is about a real-life doctor who uses humor as medicine?

  • Answer 1/11

    What movie is about a real-life doctor who uses humor as medicine?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Hunter “Patch” Adams was known to use humor to comfort people in the hospital during his medical training in the 1960s. The late Robin Williams played him in the 1998 movie. Through his Gesundheit Institute, Adams leads “clowning” tours to children’s hospitals, orphanages, and crisis centers all over the world.

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    Your Score:

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    Your score is -- well -- laughable. Put on a smile and try again.

Sources | Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on January 30, 2018 Medically Reviewed on January 30, 2018

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on
January 30, 2018

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1) jacoblund / Thinkstock

 

SOURCES:

American Psychological Association: “A Laughing Matter.”

Gesundheit Institute: “3rd Clowning & Caring in Mexico!”

Harvard Mahoney Neuroscience Center: “Humor, Laughter, and Those Aha Moments.”

Harvard Medical School: “Laugh and Be Thankful -- It’s Good for the Heart.”

Journal of Aging Research:  “Humor Therapy: Relieving Chronic Pain and Enhancing Happiness for Older Adults.”

KidsHealth: “Learning, Play and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old.”

Mayo Clinic: “Pseudobulbar Affect.”

National Institute on Drug Abuse for Teens: “Chasing the Runner's High.”

Proceedings of the Royal Society B: “Social Laughter is Correlated with an Elevated Pain Threshold.”

Psychology Today: “The Science of Laughter.”

TedTalks: “Why We Laugh, Sophie Scott, Neuroscientist”

The Tohoku Journal of Experimental Medicine: “Therapeutic Benefits of Laughter in Mental Health: A Theoretical Review.”

University of Washington: “Neuroscience for Kids: Laughter and the Brain.”

Vanderbilt University: “No Joke: Study Finds Laughing Can Burn Calories.”

YouTube: “Patch Adams [Trailer original].”

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