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How can you prepare for laser hair removal?

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Laser hair removal is more than just ''zapping'' unwanted hair. It is a medical procedure that requires training to perform and carries potential risks. Before getting laser hair removal, you should thoroughly check the credentials of the doctor or technician performing the procedure. If you are planning on undergoing laser hair removal, you should limit plucking, waxing, and electrolysis for six weeks before treatment. That's because the laser targets the hairs' roots, which are temporarily removed by waxing or plucking. You should also avoid sun exposure for six weeks before and after treatment. Sun exposure makes laser hair removal less effective and makes complications after treatment more likely.

From: Laser Hair Removal WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Society for Dermatologic Surgery: "Laser Hair Removal Information."

Dermatologic Surgery at the University of Washington: "Laser Hair Removal."

Baylor College of Medicine: "Laser Hair Removal."

FDA: "Removing Hair Safely."

The Hair Removal Journal: "How Much Does Laser Hair Removal Cost?"

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on July 15, 2017

SOURCES:

American Society for Dermatologic Surgery: "Laser Hair Removal Information."

Dermatologic Surgery at the University of Washington: "Laser Hair Removal."

Baylor College of Medicine: "Laser Hair Removal."

FDA: "Removing Hair Safely."

The Hair Removal Journal: "How Much Does Laser Hair Removal Cost?"

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on July 15, 2017

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What should you expect during laser hair removal?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.