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How is eyelid surgery performed?

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An eyelift usually takes about 2 hours if both upper and lower eyelids are done together. Your doctor will most likely use local anesthesia (a painkiller injected around the eye) with oral sedation.

If you are having the procedure done at a hospital or surgical center, you will most likely receive IV sedation.

If you're having all four eyelids done, your surgeon will probably work on the upper lids first. Your surgeon will usually cut along the natural lines of your eyelids. Through these cuts, your surgeon will separate the skin from the underlying tissue and remove the excess fat and skin (and muscle if indicated). Next, the surgeon will close those cuts with very small stitches. The stitches in the upper lids will stay for 3 to 6 days. The lower lids may or may not require stitches, depending on the technique used.

Surgery on the lower eyelids may be done using one of several techniques. In one method, your surgeon makes a cut inside your lower eyelid to remove fat. That cut won't be visible. Your surgeon can then soften fine lines in the skin using a C02 or erbium laser.

Another method involves making a cut along the eyelash margin. Through that cut, your surgeon can remove excess skin, loose muscle, and fat. The cut line fades after a short time.

After either of these procedures, your surgeon may recommend laser resurfacing.

From: Eyelid Surgery WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

The Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology: "Blepharoplasty: Eyelid Surgery."

American Society of Plastic Surgeons: "Eyelid Surgery: Blepharoplasty."

The American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery: "Surgery of the Eyelids."

 

Reviewed by Brian S. Boxer Wachler on May 15, 2019

SOURCES:

The Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology: "Blepharoplasty: Eyelid Surgery."

American Society of Plastic Surgeons: "Eyelid Surgery: Blepharoplasty."

The American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery: "Surgery of the Eyelids."

 

Reviewed by Brian S. Boxer Wachler on May 15, 2019

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What is recovery like after eyelid surgery?

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