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What are some myths about electrolysis?

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Here are some well-traveled myths about electrolysis:

  • Electrolysis is very painful. For most people, today’s methods don’t cause a lot of pain, but it can hurt. If you find it too uncomfortable, your doctor may be able to give you an anesthetic cream.
  • The electric tweezer method is permanent. The FDA and the American Medical Association recognize only electrolysis as a permanent method of removing hair. Some states prohibit those using or selling the electric tweezer from claiming it provides permanent hair removal.
  • Temporary methods of hair removal can work better. Chemical depilatories (liquids or creams) are often used to remove body hair. These products contain irritating chemicals and can be time-consuming and messy. Likewise, bleaches contain harsh chemicals and do little to disguise dark hair. They may also discolor skin. Waxing is another temporary method of hair removal and is usually done in salons. A hot wax is applied to the skin and removed once it has dried over the hair. The hair is stripped off when the wax is removed. Waxing can be painful and costly. Home waxing kits are available, but they can be messy and difficult to use. There are electrolysis devices available for home use, but they are often unsafe for use by anyone who is not trained in electrolysis.

From: Electrolysis for Hair Removal WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

FDA: "Removing Hair Safely."

TeensHealth: "Hair Removal."

MedicineNet.com: "Electrolysis for Unwanted Hair Removal."

Reviewed by Debra Jaliman on June 08, 2017

SOURCES:

FDA: "Removing Hair Safely."

TeensHealth: "Hair Removal."

MedicineNet.com: "Electrolysis for Unwanted Hair Removal."

Reviewed by Debra Jaliman on June 08, 2017

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How do I choose an electrologist for electrolysis?

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