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  • Answer 1/8

    Chemical peels usually work best on people who have:

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    • Correct Answer:

    If you have a darker complexion, a peel could leave you with long-lasting discoloration. Some experienced dermatologists get around this by doing lighter peels over many sessions, or they offer other treatments.

  • Question 1/8

    Everyone can benefit from chemical peels.

  • Answer 1/8

    Everyone can benefit from chemical peels.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    These procedures aren't a good idea if you:

    • Have an infection

    • Are pregnant or nursing

    • Have recently used the acne treatments isotretinoin or tretinoin

    • Have an active skin disease

    • Have cut or broken skin

    • Are sunburned

    • Have active Herpes simplex 1 sores

  • Answer 1/8

    What's the difference between superficial, medium-depth, and deep peels?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Each kind removes the top layers of your skin to different depths, which lets smooth skin grow back.

     

    Superficial peels use mild acids that remove dull, dead skin cells to brighten the skin.

     

    Medium peels involve slightly stronger acids that go deeper.They're better at targeting age spots, fine lines, and wrinkles.

     

    Deep peels use even stronger acids to make more dramatic improvements the skin's appearance. These work best on fair-skinned people with moderate lines or shallow scars. They also carry more risk for side effects, including changes in skin color and even scarring.

  • Question 1/8

    Superficial peels work best for:

  • Answer 1/8

    Superficial peels work best for:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    In need of a little refresher? This treatment -- often called a "lunchtime peel" -- is an easy way to get brighter and smoother skin. A doctor or aesthetician will apply a mild acid to your face, neck, chest, or hands. You can wear makeup again the same day, just make sure you avoid the sun and have broad spectrum sunscreen on. It may take 1 day to 3 days to fully recover.

  • Question 1/8

    How long does it take to recover from a chemical peel?

  • Answer 1/8

    How long does it take to recover from a chemical peel?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    No matter which type of peel you get, be patient. If you have a superficial peel, you’ll likely see some redness and irritation for up to a week.If you get medium-depth treatment, it may be 2-3 weeks before you look your best. Deep peels may take 3 weeks or longer to recover.

  • Question 1/8

    How long have chemical peels been around?

  • Answer 1/8

    How long have chemical peels been around?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Believe it or not, Egyptians used acids to peel the skin as early as 1550 B.C. Dermatologists have been doing these for more than half a century, so you can be sure they're relatively safe – as long as you choose a licensed professional. It's especially important to find a specialist for anything stronger than a mild superficial peel.

  • Question 1/8

    Chemical peels can be painful.

  • Answer 1/8

    Chemical peels can be painful.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Beauty can have a price, and in this case, part of it is pain. How much it hurts depends on many things, including what area of your skin is being peeled, how sensitive your skin is, and what method you chose. 

     

    You'll likely feel some stinging during a mild peel, sometimes until your skin finishes healing. Deeper peels are usually more painful -- and may hurt longer -- but generally only for a few minutes while the peel is going through the top layers of your skin.

     

    Your doctor will probably prescribe ice, steroid creams, or certain lotions to help protect your skin and ease the irritation while you're healing. You’ll also need plenty of sunscreen to avoid changes in your skin color.

  • Question 1/8

    A chemical peel may cause:

  • Answer 1/8

    A chemical peel may cause:

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    • Correct Answer:

    The most common side effects of superficial and medium peels include redness, irritation, and yes, maybe some crusting.

     

    Although most side effects are temporary, there's a slight chance that you could end up with scarring or a permanent change in your skin color. Talk with an experienced professional practitioner about your skin type before you decide to get a peel.

     

    Deep peels can be riskier. There's a chance they could put your heart, lungs, and kidneys at risk, so think carefully before going for it (and be especially choosy about who performs it).

     

    Peels aren't for you if you're prone to brown spots or discoloration.

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    You correctly answered out of questions.

    Results:

    Beautiful job! You know what it takes to peel back the years and reveal prettier skin.

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    Nice try. You did a solid job, but you should study up a little more if your goal is complexion perfection.

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    Not so hot. Beauty might be in the eye of the beholder, but your grasp of the facts is out of whack. Study up and try again!

Sources | Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner, MD on November 13, 2017 Medically Reviewed on November 13, 2017

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner, MD on
November 13, 2017

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1) Getty

 

SOURCES:

American Academy of Dermatology: "Is a Chemical Peel the Right Choice for You?"

American Society for Dermatologic Surgery:  "Chemical Peels."

American Society of Plastic Surgeons: "Chemical Peel."

Nikalji, N . Journal of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery , October-December 2012.

Joshua Zeichner, MD, director of cosmetic and clinical research; assistant professor of dermatology, The Mount Sinai Hospital, New York.

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.