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Does bipolar disorder run in families?

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Numerous studies have found that people with bipolar often have at least one close relative with depression or bipolar disorder.

Children who have one parent with the disorder have about a 10-25% chance of developing the disorder themselves. Children with two parents with the disorder have a 10-50% chance. If a non-identical twin sibling has the disorder, the chance that another sibling will have it is about 10-25%.

Studies of identical twins have shown that genetics are not the only factor in determining who is at risk for bipolar disorder. Because identical twins share all the same genes, if bipolar disorder were purely hereditary, then all identical twins would share the disorder.

But if one identical twin has bipolar disorder, the chances of the other twin also having bipolar disorder ranges from 40-70%.

From: Bipolar Disorder: Who’s at Risk? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition.

Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance: "Bipolar Statistics."

Child and Adolescent Bipolar Foundation: "Hypothyroidism: Is It Contributing to Your Child's Symptoms?"

Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance: "Types of Bipolar Disorder."

National Institute of Mental Health: "Different Families, Different Characteristics: Different Types of Bipolar Disorder?"

National Foundation for Depressive Illness: "Depression Facts."

National Alliance on Mental Illness: "Roadmap to Recovery and Care."

National Mental Health Association: "Bipolar Disorder: What You Need to Know."

Fieve, R. . Bipolar II

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on August 17, 2017

SOURCES:

American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition.

Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance: "Bipolar Statistics."

Child and Adolescent Bipolar Foundation: "Hypothyroidism: Is It Contributing to Your Child's Symptoms?"

Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance: "Types of Bipolar Disorder."

National Institute of Mental Health: "Different Families, Different Characteristics: Different Types of Bipolar Disorder?"

National Foundation for Depressive Illness: "Depression Facts."

National Alliance on Mental Illness: "Roadmap to Recovery and Care."

National Mental Health Association: "Bipolar Disorder: What You Need to Know."

Fieve, R. . Bipolar II

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on August 17, 2017

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Can lifestyle habits increase the risk of bipolar disorder?

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