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Is it okay to take mood stabilizers while pregnant?

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Taking multiple mood-stabilizing drugs can carry more risks than taking just one. Because of the rare risk for a particular kind of heart defect, lithium is sometimes not recommended during the first three months of pregnancy unless its benefits clearly outweigh the risks. Lithium may, though, be a safer choice than some anticonvulsants. And when lithium is continued after childbirth, it can reduce the rate of relapse from 50% to 10%. It's best to talk to your doctor to decide the right plan for you.

From: Bipolar Disorder in Pregnancy WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Freeman, M. , December 2007. American Journal of Psychiatry

Consumer Reports : "Drugs for bipolar disorder in pregnancy."

National Alliance on Mental Illness: "Managing Pregnancy and Bipolar Disorder."

Viguera A. . December 2007. American Journal of Psychiatry

Shama V. , winter 2009. Canadian Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

Yonkers, K. , 2004. American Journal of  Psychiatry

MGH Women's Mental Health: "Anticonvulsants During Pregnancy in Women with Bipolar Disorder."

Yan, J. , Jan. 18, 2008. Psychiatric News

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on March 18, 2019

SOURCES:

Freeman, M. , December 2007. American Journal of Psychiatry

Consumer Reports : "Drugs for bipolar disorder in pregnancy."

National Alliance on Mental Illness: "Managing Pregnancy and Bipolar Disorder."

Viguera A. . December 2007. American Journal of Psychiatry

Shama V. , winter 2009. Canadian Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

Yonkers, K. , 2004. American Journal of  Psychiatry

MGH Women's Mental Health: "Anticonvulsants During Pregnancy in Women with Bipolar Disorder."

Yan, J. , Jan. 18, 2008. Psychiatric News

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on March 18, 2019

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