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What are tips I can follow to stay organized and manage bipolar disorder at work?

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Many people -- not just those with bipolar disorder -- use tips like these to stay more organized:

  • Make daily to-do checklists and check items off as they are completed.
  • Use electronic organizers.
  • Divide large assignments into smaller tasks. If possible, focus on one project at a time.
  • Ask about having written job task instructions.
  • Use a watch with an hourly alarm to remind you about specific tasks.

SOURCES: Kessler, R. , June 2005. Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance: "Wellness at Work." Po W. Wang, MD, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Stanford School of Medicine.Job Accommodation Network: "Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with bipolar Disorder." National Institute of Mental Health: "Bipolar Disorder." WebMD Medical Reference: "Bipolar Disorder and Going to Work."




Archives of General Psychiatry

Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg on September 23, 2018

SOURCES: Kessler, R. , June 2005. Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance: "Wellness at Work." Po W. Wang, MD, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Stanford School of Medicine.Job Accommodation Network: "Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with bipolar Disorder." National Institute of Mental Health: "Bipolar Disorder." WebMD Medical Reference: "Bipolar Disorder and Going to Work."




Archives of General Psychiatry

Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg on September 23, 2018

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How do I develop my team skills to help manage bipolar disorder at work?

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