PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What should you think about and record before seeing a doctor about bipolar disorder?

ANSWER

Before your visit, think about and note the following:

  • Your mental and physical health concerns
  • Symptoms you’ve noticed
  • Unusual behaviors you’ve had
  • Past illnesses
  • Your family history of mental illness (bipolar disorder, depression, mania, seasonal affective disorder or SAD, or others)
  • Medications you are taking now and in the past (bring all medications to your doctor’s appointment)
  • Natural dietary supplements you take
  • Your lifestyle habits (exercise, diet, smoking, alcohol, recreational drug use)
  • Your sleep habits
  • Causes of stress in your life

From: Bipolar Diagnosis WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Institute of Mental Health: "Step-BD Women’s Studies."

American Psychiatric Association: "Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Patients With Bipolar Disorder."

National Institute of Mental Health: Strategic Plan: Pathways to Health: Charting the Science of Brain, Mind, and Behavior.

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-5  , American Psychiatric Press.

Fieve, R. . Bipolar II

Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg on February 20, 2018

SOURCES:

National Institute of Mental Health: "Step-BD Women’s Studies."

American Psychiatric Association: "Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Patients With Bipolar Disorder."

National Institute of Mental Health: Strategic Plan: Pathways to Health: Charting the Science of Brain, Mind, and Behavior.

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-5  , American Psychiatric Press.

Fieve, R. . Bipolar II

Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg on February 20, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

What tests will the doctor use to make a bipolar diagnosis?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: