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Where can you seek help if you need to take time off work due to bipolar disorder?

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If you need time off because of your bipolar disorder, you may not need to take vacation or sick leave. Your employer may offer short- or long-term disability insurance, which gives you a percentage of your salary. Your company’s Human Resources department can help. The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) lets you take up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year. You can apply for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits if you can’t work due to a mental or physical disability.

SOURCES: Kessler, R. , June 2005. Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance: "Wellness at Work." Po W. Wang, MD, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Stanford School of Medicine.Job Accommodation Network: "Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with bipolar Disorder." National Institute of Mental Health: "Bipolar Disorder." WebMD Medical Reference: "Bipolar Disorder and Going to Work."




Archives of General Psychiatry

Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg on September 23, 2018

SOURCES: Kessler, R. , June 2005. Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance: "Wellness at Work." Po W. Wang, MD, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Stanford School of Medicine.Job Accommodation Network: "Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with bipolar Disorder." National Institute of Mental Health: "Bipolar Disorder." WebMD Medical Reference: "Bipolar Disorder and Going to Work."




Archives of General Psychiatry

Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg on September 23, 2018

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