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How are pervasive developmental disorders (PDDs) or autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) diagnosed?

ANSWER

To make the diagnosis, doctors observe the child and ask questions of the parents or guardians about the child’s behaviors. There is no lab test for an autism spectrum disorder.

The key is to find out as soon possible if a child is on the spectrum. That way, you can line up resources to help your child reach his full potential. The sooner that starts, the better.

SOURCES:

Emory Autism Center: “Characteristics of autism and the pervasive developmental disorders (PDD).”

American Academy of Pediatrics News: “New DSM-5 includes changes to autism criteria.”

American Psychiatric Association: “Autism spectrum disorder.”

Autism Society: “Pervasive developmental disorders (PDD).”

Autism Speaks: “PDD-NOS” and “Autism & Your Family.”

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: “Autism spectrum disorder fact sheet.”

Reviewed by Roy Benaroch on November 18, 2016

SOURCES:

Emory Autism Center: “Characteristics of autism and the pervasive developmental disorders (PDD).”

American Academy of Pediatrics News: “New DSM-5 includes changes to autism criteria.”

American Psychiatric Association: “Autism spectrum disorder.”

Autism Society: “Pervasive developmental disorders (PDD).”

Autism Speaks: “PDD-NOS” and “Autism & Your Family.”

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: “Autism spectrum disorder fact sheet.”

Reviewed by Roy Benaroch on November 18, 2016

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How are pervasive developmental disorders (PDDs) or autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) treated?

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