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How often does autism happen to children in the United States?

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Over the last decade, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of diagnosed cases of autism in the U.S. and around the world. Experts do not know if this is because the disorder is actually on the rise, or if doctors are simply diagnosing it more effectively. We should learn more answers to questions like these over the next few years. That's because many researchers are currently looking into autism's origins, prevalence, and treatment.

From: Parenting a Child With Autism WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Autism Fact Sheet." National Mental Health Information Center: "Children and Adolescents with Autism." National Institute of Child Health and Human Development: "Autism Overview: What We Know" and "Autism research at the NICHD." National Institutes of Health: "Gene linked to autism in families with more than one affected child."  Centers for Disease Control: "Vaccines and Autism: Important Conclusions from the Institute of Medicine."




Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on May 20, 2018

SOURCES: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Autism Fact Sheet." National Mental Health Information Center: "Children and Adolescents with Autism." National Institute of Child Health and Human Development: "Autism Overview: What We Know" and "Autism research at the NICHD." National Institutes of Health: "Gene linked to autism in families with more than one affected child."  Centers for Disease Control: "Vaccines and Autism: Important Conclusions from the Institute of Medicine."




Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on May 20, 2018

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What is the treatment for children with autism?

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