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What are the symptoms of Rett syndrome?

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Symptoms of Rett syndrome include:

  • Slowed growth. The brain doesn’t grow properly, and the head is usually small (doctors call this microcephaly). This stunted growth becomes clearer as the child gets older.
  • Problems with hand movements. Most children with Rett syndrome lose the use of their hands. They tend to wring or rub their hands together.
  • No language skills. Between ages 1 to 4, social and language skills start to decline. Children with Rett syndrome stop talking and can have extreme social anxiety. They may stay away from or not be interested in other people, toys, and their surroundings.
  • Problems with muscles and coordination. This can make walking awkward.

From: Rett Syndrome: What to Know WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: Zhang, Y. 2008. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Rett Syndrome Fact Sheet." : “The autism spectrum: subgroups, boundaries, and treatment.” National Institute of Mental Health: "Autism Spectrum Disorders."



Neurology,Psychiatric Clinics of North America

Mayo Clinic: “Rett Syndrome.”

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on January 8, 2017

SOURCES: Zhang, Y. 2008. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Rett Syndrome Fact Sheet." : “The autism spectrum: subgroups, boundaries, and treatment.” National Institute of Mental Health: "Autism Spectrum Disorders."



Neurology,Psychiatric Clinics of North America

Mayo Clinic: “Rett Syndrome.”

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on January 8, 2017

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What are the symptoms of troubled breathing from Rett syndrome?

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