PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What kinds of things does an occupational look at to help evaluate autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in children?

ANSWER

An occupational therapist can observe children to see if they can do tasks they are expected to do at their ages -- getting dressed or playing a game, for example. The therapist might note the following:

  • Attention span and stamina
  • Transition to new activities
  • Play skills
  • Need for personal space
  • Responses to touch or other stimuli
  • Motor skills such as posture, balance, or moving small objects
  • Aggression
  • Interactions between the child and caregivers

SOURCES:

The American Occupational Therapy Association: ''Supporting Parents of Children With Autism: The Role of Occupational Therapy;''  ''Using Videotapes To Help Children With Autism;''  ''OT for Children With Psychosocial Deficits;''  ''AOTA Evidence Briefs: Efficacy of Sensory and Motor Interventions for Children with Autism;'' and ''Creating Evidence: Sensory Integration and Children With Autism.''

Association for Science in Autism Treatment: ''Description of Service Providers'' and ''Sensory Integrative Therapy (Sensory Integration, SI, or SIT).''

National Institute of Mental Health: ''Autism Spectrum Disorders (Pervasive Developmental Disorders).''

Autism Speaks: ''Treatments for Autism.''

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on November 12, 2018

SOURCES:

The American Occupational Therapy Association: ''Supporting Parents of Children With Autism: The Role of Occupational Therapy;''  ''Using Videotapes To Help Children With Autism;''  ''OT for Children With Psychosocial Deficits;''  ''AOTA Evidence Briefs: Efficacy of Sensory and Motor Interventions for Children with Autism;'' and ''Creating Evidence: Sensory Integration and Children With Autism.''

Association for Science in Autism Treatment: ''Description of Service Providers'' and ''Sensory Integrative Therapy (Sensory Integration, SI, or SIT).''

National Institute of Mental Health: ''Autism Spectrum Disorders (Pervasive Developmental Disorders).''

Autism Speaks: ''Treatments for Autism.''

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on November 12, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

What are benefits of occupational therapy for people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD)?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.