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Can an infection cause dizziness?

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Inflammation of the nerves in your ears can cause vertigo, when you feel like you're spinning or the room is moving around you. It can be either vestibular neuritis or labyrinthitis. Vestibular neuritis refers to inflammation of your vestibular nerve only while labyrinthitis involved both your vestibular nerve and your cochlear nerve.. Both conditions are caused by an infection. Usually, a virus is to blame.  But bacteria from a middle ear infection or meningitis can make their way into your inner ear as well. In this case, dizziness usually comes on suddenly. Your ears may ring, and it  could be hard to hear. You might be nauseated and have a fever along with ear pain. Symptoms can last several weeks. If it results from a virus and can't be treated with antibiotics, medication can help you feel better as the infection runs its course.

SOURCES:

The Cleveland Clinic: "Dizziness."

Lewis, J. Merck Manual, 2016.

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders: "Meniere's Disease."

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease: "Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia)."

National Health Service: "Dizziness (lightheadedness)."

Vestibular Disorders Association: "Causes of Dizziness."

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on August 22, 2020

SOURCES:

The Cleveland Clinic: "Dizziness."

Lewis, J. Merck Manual, 2016.

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders: "Meniere's Disease."

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease: "Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia)."

National Health Service: "Dizziness (lightheadedness)."

Vestibular Disorders Association: "Causes of Dizziness."

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on August 22, 2020

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Can Meniere's disease cause dizziness?

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