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How does an acoustic neuroma develop?

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Acoustic neuromas -- sometimes called vestibular schwannomas or neurilemmoma -- usually grow slowly over a period of years. Although they do not actually invade the brain, they can push on it as they grow. Larger tumors can press on nearby cranial nerves that control the muscles of facial expression and sensation. If tumors become large enough to press on the brain stem or cerebellum, they can be deadly.

From: Acoustic Neuroma WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: UCLA Health System: "Acoustic Neuroma Brain Tumor." Acoustic Neuroma Foundation: "What Is Acoustic Neuroma?" Acoustic Neuroma Association: "Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma." American Hearing Research Foundation: "Acoustic Neuroma." Genetics Home Reference: "Neurofibromatosis type 2."





Acoustic Neuroma Association: "Treatment Options."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on March 4, 2018

SOURCES: UCLA Health System: "Acoustic Neuroma Brain Tumor." Acoustic Neuroma Foundation: "What Is Acoustic Neuroma?" Acoustic Neuroma Association: "Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma." American Hearing Research Foundation: "Acoustic Neuroma." Genetics Home Reference: "Neurofibromatosis type 2."





Acoustic Neuroma Association: "Treatment Options."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on March 4, 2018

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What are the early symptoms of acoustic neuroma?

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