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How is a labyrinthectomy used to treat Ménière’s disease?

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During a labyrinthectomy, your surgeon destroys the parts of the ear that control balance. You aren’t awake during this procedure, and you stay in the hospital a few days. You will have hearing loss afterward, so it’s for people who have really bad vertigo and already don’t hear well.

From: What Is Meniere's Disease? WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Neil Lava on November 24, 2018

Medically Reviewed on 11/24/2018

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: “Diseases and Conditions – Ménière’s Disease.”

Vestibular Disorders Association: “Ménière’s Disease.”

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders: “Ménière’s Disease.”

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: “Understanding Autoimmune Diseases.”

American Academy of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery: “Ménière’s Disease.”

University of California San Diego Health System: “Ménière’s Disease.”

Reviewed by Neil Lava on November 24, 2018

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: “Diseases and Conditions – Ménière’s Disease.”

Vestibular Disorders Association: “Ménière’s Disease.”

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders: “Ménière’s Disease.”

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: “Understanding Autoimmune Diseases.”

American Academy of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery: “Ménière’s Disease.”

University of California San Diego Health System: “Ménière’s Disease.”

Reviewed by Neil Lava on November 24, 2018

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