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How is a shunt used for normal pressure hydrocephalus?

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A shunt is a thin tube that's put in your brain to drain fluid away. The tube is routed under the skin from your head to another part of your body, usually your lower belly. The shunt has a valve that opens to release fluid when the pressure builds up. The fluid drains harmlessly and is later absorbed into your bloodstream.

A shunt operation is not a cure, but it can help with symptoms.

From: Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Neil Lava on September 16, 2018

Medically Reviewed on 09/16/2018

 SOURCES: American Stroke Association. Hydrocephalus Foundation. 

Reviewed by Neil Lava on September 16, 2018

 SOURCES: American Stroke Association. Hydrocephalus Foundation. 

Reviewed by Neil Lava on September 16, 2018

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Do shunt operations work for everyone with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH)?

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