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How is serotonin syndrome treated?

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People with serotonin syndrome are typically hospitalized for observation and treatment of symptoms. For example, benzodiazepines are given to treat agitation and/or seizures. Intravenous fluids are given to maintain hydration. Removing the drug responsible for the serotonin syndrome is critical. Hydration by intravenous (IV) fluids) is also common. In severe cases, a medication called cyproheptadine (Periactin) that blocks serotonin production may be used.

From: What Is Serotonin Syndrome? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

American Headache Society: "What is Serotonin Syndrome and What Should You Know About It?"

National Cancer Institute: "Serotonin." OhioHealthOnline: "Serotonin Syndrome." MedlinePlus: "Serotonin Syndrome." Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: "New report finds little evidence to determine the usefulness of genetic tests in the treatment of depression." Boyer, E. , March 17, 2005.



New England Journal of Medicine

Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg on February 9, 2017

SOURCES: 

American Headache Society: "What is Serotonin Syndrome and What Should You Know About It?"

National Cancer Institute: "Serotonin." OhioHealthOnline: "Serotonin Syndrome." MedlinePlus: "Serotonin Syndrome." Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: "New report finds little evidence to determine the usefulness of genetic tests in the treatment of depression." Boyer, E. , March 17, 2005.



New England Journal of Medicine

Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg on February 9, 2017

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