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How is Tourette's syndrome diagnosed?

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If you or your child has symptoms of Tourette's, your doctor may want you to see a neurologist, a specialist who treats diseases of the nervous system. There aren't any tests for the condition, but he’ll ask you questions, like:

  • What did you notice that brought you here today?
  • Do you often move your body in a way you can’t control? How long has that been happening?
  • Do you ever say things or make sounds without meaning to? When did it start?
  • Does anything make your symptoms better? What makes them worse?
  • Do you feel anxious or have trouble focusing?
  • Does anyone else in your family have these kinds of symptoms?

From: Tourette's Syndrome WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: "Tourette Syndrome."

National Alliance on Mental Illness: "Tourette's Syndrome."

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Tourette Syndrome Fact Sheet."

CDC: "Facts About Tourette Syndrome."

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on June 11, 2019

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: "Tourette Syndrome."

National Alliance on Mental Illness: "Tourette's Syndrome."

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Tourette Syndrome Fact Sheet."

CDC: "Facts About Tourette Syndrome."

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on June 11, 2019

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What imaging tests are used to diagnose Tourette's syndrome?

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