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What are early symptoms of ALS?

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Signs of ALS can appear gradually. You may notice a funny feeling in your hand that makes it harder to grip the steering wheel. Or, you may start to slur your words. Each person with the disease feels different symptoms, especially at first.

Some common early symptoms include:

ALS may affect only one hand or leg at first.

  • Stumbling
  • A hard time holding items with your hands
  • Slurred speech
  • Swallowing problems
  • Muscle cramps
  • Worsening posture
  • A hard time holding your head up
  • Muscle stiffness

From: What Are the Symptoms of ALS? WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Neil Lava on November 24, 2018

Medically Reviewed on 11/24/2018

SOURCES:

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: “What is Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis?”

ALS Association: “Symptoms and Diagnosis.”

Mayo Clinic: “Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Symptoms and Causes.”

ALS Association: “Assistive Technology.”

NIH. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: “What Is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?”

Reviewed by Neil Lava on November 24, 2018

SOURCES:

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: “What is Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis?”

ALS Association: “Symptoms and Diagnosis.”

Mayo Clinic: “Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Symptoms and Causes.”

ALS Association: “Assistive Technology.”

NIH. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: “What Is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?”

Reviewed by Neil Lava on November 24, 2018

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What are advanced symptoms of ALS?

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