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What can cause pseudobulbar affect?

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An injury or disease that affects your brain can lead to pseudobulbar affect. About half the people who've had a stroke get it. Other brain conditions commonly linked to pseudobulbar affect include:

  • Brain tumor
  • Dementia
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  • Parkinson's disease

From: Pseudobulbar Affect (PBA) WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Ahmed, A. , November 29, 2013. Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management

Brain Injury Association of America: "What is pseudobulbar affect (PBA)?

Cruz, M. , June 2013. Pharmacy and Therapeutics

Johns Hopkins Health Library: "Electroencephalogram (EEG)."

Merriam-Webster Dictionary: "Prefrontal Cortex."

National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences: "Pseudobulbar affect."

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: "Pseudobulbar Affect."

National Stroke Association: "Pseudobulbar Affect. -- PBA."

News Release, Avanir Pharmaceuticals.

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on June 06, 2018

SOURCES:

Ahmed, A. , November 29, 2013. Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management

Brain Injury Association of America: "What is pseudobulbar affect (PBA)?

Cruz, M. , June 2013. Pharmacy and Therapeutics

Johns Hopkins Health Library: "Electroencephalogram (EEG)."

Merriam-Webster Dictionary: "Prefrontal Cortex."

National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences: "Pseudobulbar affect."

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: "Pseudobulbar Affect."

National Stroke Association: "Pseudobulbar Affect. -- PBA."

News Release, Avanir Pharmaceuticals.

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on June 06, 2018

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How is pseudobulbar affect diagnosed?

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