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What causes chronic paresthesia?

ANSWER

Chronic paresthesia can be caused by:

  • An injury or accident that caused nerve damage
  • A stroke or mini-stroke
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Diabetes
  • A pinched nerve (often in your neck, shoulder, or arm)
  • Sciatica
  • Carpel tunnel syndrome -
  • Lack of some vitamins, especially low levels of vitamin B12
  • Alcohol abuse
  • Certain medications, such as some types of chemotherapy that cause nerve irritation or damage as well as some antibiotics, HIV, and anti-seizure medications

From: What Is Paresthesia? WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Neil Lava on November 24, 2018

Medically Reviewed on 11/24/2018

SOURCES:

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "NINDS Paresthesia Information."

Harvard Medical School: "Vitamin B12 Deficiency Can Be Sneaky, Harmful."

Gov.UK/ National Health Service: "Pins and Needles," "Stroke."

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: "What Is MS?"

Reviewed by Neil Lava on November 24, 2018

SOURCES:

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "NINDS Paresthesia Information."

Harvard Medical School: "Vitamin B12 Deficiency Can Be Sneaky, Harmful."

Gov.UK/ National Health Service: "Pins and Needles," "Stroke."

National Multiple Sclerosis Society: "What Is MS?"

Reviewed by Neil Lava on November 24, 2018

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How can paresthesia be treated?

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