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What is auditory processing disorder (APD)?

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People with auditory processing disorder (APD) have a hard time hearing small sound differences in words. Someone says, "Please raise your hand," and you hear something like "Please haze your plan." You tell your child, "Look at the cows over there," and he may hear, "Look at the clown on the chair."

APD, also known as central auditory processing disorder, isn't hearing loss or a learning disorder. It means your brain doesn't "hear" sounds in the usual way. It's not a problem with understanding meaning.

SOURCES:

Auditory Processing Disorder Foundation.

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association: "Understanding Auditory Processing Disorders in Children."

UK National Health Service: "Auditory processing disorder."

Understood (for Learning & Attention Issues): "Understanding Auditory Processing Disorder."

 

Reviewed by Shelley A. Borgia on March 7, 2019

SOURCES:

Auditory Processing Disorder Foundation.

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association: "Understanding Auditory Processing Disorders in Children."

UK National Health Service: "Auditory processing disorder."

Understood (for Learning & Attention Issues): "Understanding Auditory Processing Disorder."

 

Reviewed by Shelley A. Borgia on March 7, 2019

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Who can get auditory processing disorder (APD)?

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