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What therapies can help treat amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)?

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ALS, also called Lou Gehrig’s disease, kills the nerves that control motion in your body. Most treatments for ALS involve managing the symptoms of the disease as it worsens. Some of them include:

Physical therapy and exercise: These keep your muscles strong and working as long as possible.

Hot tub and whirlpool baths: These can ease your muscle spasms or cramps.

Dietary counseling: This becomes really important when swallowing becomes a problem.

Speech therapy: Specialists can help you learn ways to make your speech more clear when you talk or other methods of communicating, such as writing with pen and paper or an alphabet board.

Occupational therapy: This can help you find ways to dress, bathe, and groom, and to set up you home to make it easier to get around.

From: Are There Any Treatments for ALS? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

LS Association: “Quick Facts About ALS.”

Mayo Clinic: “Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: Treatment.”

CDC: “Prevalence of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis -- United States, 2012–2013.”

Johns Hopkins University, Robert Packard Center for Treatment of ALS.

National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke: “Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Fact Sheet.”

University of California, San Francisco Medical Center: “ALS.”

Reviewed by Neil Lava on June 3, 2017

SOURCES: 

LS Association: “Quick Facts About ALS.”

Mayo Clinic: “Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: Treatment.”

CDC: “Prevalence of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis -- United States, 2012–2013.”

Johns Hopkins University, Robert Packard Center for Treatment of ALS.

National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke: “Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Fact Sheet.”

University of California, San Francisco Medical Center: “ALS.”

Reviewed by Neil Lava on June 3, 2017

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What tools and devices can help with treating amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)?

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