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What will happen to your ear when you have canal dehiscence syndrome?

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It’s a rare disorder that affects your balance and hearing. It happens when you have a hole or a very thin place in the bone in your ear that helps your body balance itself. Three small looped structures inside your ear called semicircular canals have fluid in them that moves when you move. When the fluid moves, tiny hairs inside the canals also move. Your brain uses this information to tell your muscles how to keep your balance. But a hole in the bone can affect how your body’s sensors react to movement.

SOURCES:

Adult and Pediatric Otology and Neurotology: "Superior semicircular canal dehiscence syndrome."

American Speech Language Hearing Association: "Superior Canal Dehiscence."

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center: "Superior semicircular canal dehiscence syndrome."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery: Recent Findings."

Kids Health: "Your Ears."

Medscape: "Superior Canal Dehiscence."

Vestibular Disorders Association: "How Are Vestibular Disorders Diagnosed?" "Superior Semicircular Canal Dehiscence (SSCD)."

Reviewed by Shelley A. Borgia on August 17, 2018

SOURCES:

Adult and Pediatric Otology and Neurotology: "Superior semicircular canal dehiscence syndrome."

American Speech Language Hearing Association: "Superior Canal Dehiscence."

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center: "Superior semicircular canal dehiscence syndrome."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery: Recent Findings."

Kids Health: "Your Ears."

Medscape: "Superior Canal Dehiscence."

Vestibular Disorders Association: "How Are Vestibular Disorders Diagnosed?" "Superior Semicircular Canal Dehiscence (SSCD)."

Reviewed by Shelley A. Borgia on August 17, 2018

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What causes canal dehiscence syndrome?

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