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What will your therapist do to treat dysarthria?

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Your therapist will teach you:

The therapist will work with your family to help them understand you better. She may suggest that they:

  • Exercises to strengthen the muscles of your mouth and jaw
  • Ways to speak more clearly, such as talking more slowly or pausing to catch your breath
  • How to control your breath to make your voice louder
  • How to use devices like an amplifier to improve the sound of your voice
  • Your therapist also will give you tips to help you communicate, such as: Carry a notebook or smartphone with you. If someone doesn't understand you, write or type what you want to say.
  • Make sure you have the other person's attention.
  • Speak slowly.
  • Talk face to face if you can. The other person will be able to understand you better if they can see your mouth move.
  • Try not to talk in noisy places, like at a restaurant or party. Turn down music or the TV before you speak, or go outside.
  • Use facial expressions or hand gestures to get your point across.
  • Use short phrases and words that are easier for you to say.
  • Ask you to repeat yourself if they don't understand something
  • Give you time to finish what you have to say
  • Look at you when they talk with you
  • Repeat the part they understood so you don't have to say the whole thing again
  • Try not to finish your sentences for you

From: What Is Dysarthria? WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Neil Lava on November 11, 2018

Medically Reviewed on 11/11/2018

SOURCES:

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association: "Dysarthria."

American Stroke Association: "Steps to Improve Communication for Survivors with Dysarthria."

National Health Services: "Dysarthria (difficulty speaking)."

National Multiple Sclerosis Society. "Dysarthria in Multiple Sclerosis."

University of Rochester Medical Center: "Dysarthria."

Reviewed by Neil Lava on November 11, 2018

SOURCES:

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association: "Dysarthria."

American Stroke Association: "Steps to Improve Communication for Survivors with Dysarthria."

National Health Services: "Dysarthria (difficulty speaking)."

National Multiple Sclerosis Society. "Dysarthria in Multiple Sclerosis."

University of Rochester Medical Center: "Dysarthria."

Reviewed by Neil Lava on November 11, 2018

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