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Why am I dizzy?

ANSWER

Many parts of your body -- including your eyes, brain, inner ear, and nerves in your feet and spine -- work together to keep you balanced. When a part of that system is off, you can feel dizzy. It can be a sign of something serious, and it can be dangerous if it makes you fall. Your doctor will look at all your symptoms and overall health to figure out what's going on and how to treat it.

From: Why Am I Dizzy? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

The Cleveland Clinic: "Dizziness."

Lewis, J. 2016. Merck Manual,

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders: "Meniere's Disease."

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease: "Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia)."

National Health Service: "Dizziness (lightheadedness)."

Vestibular Disorders Association: "Causes of Dizziness."

Reviewed by Lisa Bernstein on August 1, 2018

SOURCES:

The Cleveland Clinic: "Dizziness."

Lewis, J. 2016. Merck Manual,

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders: "Meniere's Disease."

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease: "Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia)."

National Health Service: "Dizziness (lightheadedness)."

Vestibular Disorders Association: "Causes of Dizziness."

Reviewed by Lisa Bernstein on August 1, 2018

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When do you need medical attention for dizziness?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.