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  • Question 1/9

    Your brain stays in touch with your body through:

  • Answer 1/9

    Your brain stays in touch with your body through:

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    • Correct Answer:

    This network is called your peripheral nervous system, and it has two major parts. One controls the things you don’t have to think about, like your heartbeat or digestion (autonomic nervous system). The other (somatic nervous system) connects your senses to your brain and lets you move your muscles.

  • Question 1/9

    Which is not part of your nervous system?

  • Answer 1/9

    Which is not part of your nervous system?

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    The brain is your body’s control center, and your spinal cord is its message hub. Together, they make up your central nervous system.

    Your brain is always “talking” to the rest of your body. Messages go through your spinal cord to your arms, legs, and all your other body parts and organs.

  • Question 1/9

    Your brain weighs about:

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    Your brain weighs about:

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    This is the place where you think, feel, learn, and remember. Your brain is also in charge of how you talk, walk, and even breathe. There’s a lot going on in a small space, so it creates folds and grooves to make room for all the information it has to hold.

  • Question 1/9

    Your nerves are made of tiny cells called:

  • Answer 1/9

    Your nerves are made of tiny cells called:

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    They carry messages to and from your brain. You have billions of them. Some clue your brain in to what’s going on with your eyes, ears, nose, tongue, and skin. Others take messages from your brain to your muscles.  

  • Answer 1/9

    A thought starts with:

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    It’s sort of like in the cartoons: When you have an idea, a lightbulb goes off. It’s called a nerve impulse, and it triggers chemicals (called neurotransmitters) to send signals to other neurons and your brain.

  • Question 1/9

    “Fight or flight” signals are sent through the: 

  • Answer 1/9

    “Fight or flight” signals are sent through the: 

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    When your stroll down a garden path is halted by the sudden appearance of a snake, your brain sends adrenaline into your bloodstream. This puts you on high alert and gets you ready for whatever might happen next.

    Your heart beats faster, pushing more blood to your heart and other organs. Your blood pressure goes up, too, and your airways get wider so you can get more oxygen to your lungs.

  • Question 1/9

    Neurotransmitters that send signals about pain are called endorphins.

  • Answer 1/9

    Neurotransmitters that send signals about pain are called endorphins.

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    Dopamine talks to your brain about movement, and serotonin sends messages about your mood.

    These chemicals are found where one neuron meets another (called a synapse). Neurons connect to one another in more than 100 trillion places. Scientists call this complex network a “neuron forest.”

  • Question 1/9

    This hurts the neurons that affect movement:

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    This hurts the neurons that affect movement:

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    Signs include shaking in your hands or fingers, slow movement, stiff muscles, problems with balance, and changes in speech. See your doctor if you notice any of these. Other conditions can cause them as well.

  • Question 1/9

    When you have this, neurons lose their connections to one another:

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    When you have this, neurons lose their connections to one another:

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    When they’re cut off from one another, neurons stop working like they should and eventually die.

  • Your Score:

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    Your Score:

    You correctly answered out of questions.

    Results:

    Good job! Your synapses are firing on all cylinders.

    Results:

    Not bad, but you seemed a little nervous.

    Results:

    Looks like there may be some holes in your neural netwok.

Sources | Reviewed by Minesh Khatri, MD on June 25, 2018 Medically Reviewed on June 25, 2018

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri, MD on
June 25, 2018

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1) SilverV / Thinkstock

SOURCES:

Alzheimer’s Association: “Brain Tour.”

Harvard Health Publications: “Understanding the stress response.”

KidsHealth.org: “Brain and Nervous System.”

Mayo Clinic: “Parkinson’s Disease.”

National Cancer Institute: “The Peripheral Nervous System.”

National Institute on Aging: “A Primer on Alzheimer’s Disease and the Brain.”

Neuroscience for Kids: “Types of Neurons (Nerve Cells)”

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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