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  • Question 1/11

    Vertigo is the same as lightheadedness.

  • Answer 1/11

    Vertigo is the same as lightheadedness.

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    Vertigo is the feeling that you or your surroundings are spinning. Lightheadedness is when you feel unsteady or about to faint. Both are often described as dizziness, which can lead to balance problems, falls, and broken bones.

  • Question 1/11

    You're more likely to get vertigo when you're:

  • Answer 1/11

    You're more likely to get vertigo when you're:

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    The condition is unusual in childhood. The chances of having it go up in your 20s. Of people 65 and older, about 80% have dizziness, and about half of them have the most common kind of vertigo.

  • Question 1/11

    Where in your body would you find the key structures for balance?

  • Answer 1/11

    Where in your body would you find the key structures for balance?

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    The most sensitive and important parts are the vestibular system in your inner ear. It sends signals to your brain about where your body is in space. Your eyes also help you keep your balance, as do your muscles and joints.

  • Question 1/11

    What did the main character in Alfred Hitchcock's film Vertigo fear?

  • Answer 1/11

    What did the main character in Alfred Hitchcock's film Vertigo fear?

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    • Correct Answer:

    The title of the movie is misleading. Sometimes fear of heights (acrophobia) can make you feel dizzy, but most cases of vertigo have nothing to do with being up high or looking far down or up.

  • Question 1/11

    What might cause vertigo?

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    What might cause vertigo?

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    Usually, trouble with your ear -- infections, problems with inner ear fluids (Meniere's disease), non-cancerous tumors, and damage to the vestibular system -- will trigger the spins. Sometimes it's caused by stroke, migraines, or medication side effects.

  • Question 1/11

    The most common type of vertigo can be treated with a simple head exercise.

  • Answer 1/11

    The most common type of vertigo can be treated with a simple head exercise.

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    Short spells of a spinning sensation usually aren't life-threatening. When crystals in the inner ear are dislodged, you get benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Moving your head in a certain way can send the crystals back to the right place. A physical therapist can teach you how to do this.

  • Question 1/11

    Does anxiety trigger vertigo?

  • Answer 1/11

    Does anxiety trigger vertigo?

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    Stress and anxiety alone don't cause it, but they can make it worse. And if you have an anxiety disorder, a panic attack could make you feel dizzy, faint, nauseous, or even "out of body."

  • Question 1/11

    When you have trouble with dizziness, your primary care doctor may send you to a specialist called an:

  • Answer 1/11

    When you have trouble with dizziness, your primary care doctor may send you to a specialist called an:

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    This type of doctor diagnoses and treats disorders of the ear, nose, and throat. Doctors who focus only on ear problems are called otologists or neurotologists.

  • Question 1/11

    One way to ease vertigo is to take:

  • Answer 1/11

    One way to ease vertigo is to take:

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    • Correct Answer:

    If it's not a symptom of an ongoing problem, your doctor may prescribe drugs that block nerve impulses, calm anxiety, and control nausea. Antihistamines, the kind of medicine you take for allergies, can also prevent or lessen motion sickness.

  • Question 1/11

    Can playing video games lead to vertigo?

  • Answer 1/11

    Can playing video games lead to vertigo?

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    3-D games that create a sense of movement may give you temporary vertigo. 3-D movies may make you feel dizzy or queasy, too.

  • Question 1/11

    A great exercise to improve your balance is:

  • Answer 1/11

    A great exercise to improve your balance is:

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    • Correct Answer:

    Many studies have shown these slow, focused movements strengthen muscles, train your brain, and help you learn to walk more quickly and smoothly.

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Sources | Reviewed by Neil Lava, MD on April 14, 2018 Medically Reviewed on April 14, 2018

Reviewed by Neil Lava, MD on
April 14, 2018

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SOURCES:

University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics: "Vertigo: Frequently Asked Questions."

Vestibular Disorders Association: "Improving Balance with Tai Chi," "Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV)," "Can Medication Help Me Feel Better?"

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association: "How Our Balance System Works."

LiveScience: "What Is Vertigo?"

IMDb: "Vertigo (1958)."

NHS Choices: "Vertigo."

Post, R. American Family Physician , August 2010.

Anxiety and Depression Association of America: "Panic Disorder & Agoraphobia: Symptoms."

USF Health: "Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery."

American Hearing Research Foundation: "Medical Treatment of Vertigo."

Solimini, A. PLOS One , published online Feb. 13, 2013.

The Conversation: "Do 3D films make you dizzy -- or is it just your imagination?"

Hwang, H. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society , published online Feb. 11, 2016.

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