Breast Cancer Resources

When you or someone you love finds out they have breast cancer, you’ll want to learn as much as you can about it. You may also be looking for ways to connect with other people who also have breast cancer. Here are resources to help you get started, including nonprofit organizations, blogs, and online communities.

You may find support groups that meet in person or online. Some are organized by professionals, while others are led by peers. Consider what works best for you, such as whether you’re looking for educational updates, tips for daily living during or after treatment, or emotional support. Your local hospital or doctor may sponsor support groups or be able to put you in touch with one.

When you use blogs or online communities, keep in mind that while they can offer personal perspective and information from people who’re being treated for breast cancer or who have completed treatment, it’s not medical advice. Also, ask yourself these questions:

  • Who runs or created the site? Are they selling anything?
  • Does it make claims that sound too good to be true?
  • Is the information up to date, reviewed, and based on scientific research?

Nonprofit Organizations

These nonprofit groups provide online information related to breast cancer and other conditions.

ALAS-Wings (https://alas-wings.org/): This group focuses on breast cancer in the Latina/Hispanic community.

American Cancer Society (https://www.cancer.org/cancer/breast-cancer.html): This link goes to the society’s section on breast cancer.

American Indian Cancer Foundation’s Breast Cancer Stories (https://www.americanindiancancer.org/story-types/breast-cancer-stories/)

CancerCare (https://www.cancercare.org/diagnosis/breast_cancer): CancerCare provides free support groups, workshops, and other services for people with cancer. This link goes to its section on breast cancer.

Cancer.Net (https://www.cancer.net/cancer-types/breast-cancer): Backed by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, this link goes to their section on stage 0, I, II, or III breast cancer. Cancer.net also has a section on metastatic breast cancer: https://www.cancer.net/cancer-types/breast-cancer-metastatic

Living Beyond Breast Cancer (https://www.lbbc.org): This nonprofit organization offers support and information about breast cancer treatment and survivorship.

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Male Breast Cancer Coalition (https://malebreastcancercoalition.org/): This group is for men diagnosed with breast cancer and their loved ones.

National Breast Cancer Coalition (https://www.stopbreastcancer.org/)

National Cancer Institute (https://www.cancer.gov/types/breast): Part of the National Institutes of Health, this link goes to the institute’s section on breast cancer.

Susan G. Komen (https://www.komen.org): This organization is a major funder of research and other efforts to combat breast cancer.

Touch, the Black Breast Cancer Alliance (https://www.touchbbca.org/)

Young Survival Coalition (https://www.youngsurvival.org/): This organization focuses on people younger than 40 with breast cancer.

Blogs

Writers with breast cancer create their own websites, called blogs, to share their experiences. Blogs can be a good way to understand, get inspired by, and connect with other people in the breast cancer community. Just don't take medical advice from anyone who isn't your doctor.

 

Online Communities

Facebook. You’ll find several breast cancer groups. Many are open to anyone with this cancer, but you may have to ask permission to join.

Breast Cancer Support -- I Got This!

Instagram. Breast cancer accounts include:

Reddit. This online community brings people together based on their interests. The website is organized by topics. Several subgroups, called subreddits, are devoted to breast cancer.

https://www.reddit.com/r/breastcancer/

Popular hashtags. You can search Twitter for #breastcancer.

Many breast cancer nonprofit groups are on Facebook, Instagram, and other social media sites. Check their official accounts.

The quality of information on social media can vary widely. Be sure that you:

  • Check the organization's website and click on the links to go directly to its social media account.
  • Verify that the account is real. For example, Twitter uses a blue badge with a white checkmark to show that an account has been verified.

WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Sabrina Felson, MD on October 09, 2019

Sources

SOURCE:

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: “Finding and Evaluating Online Resources.”

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