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How can dense breasts affect mammogram results?

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Dense breasts are harder to read on a mammogram. Tumors and masses show up as white spots like dense tissue does. So it can be a challenge to tell what’s normal and what’s suspicious. It’s easier to miss a trouble spot or to falsely diagnose breast cancer.

But even in women with dense breasts, masses are correctly identified most of the time. And new digital technology has made mammograms more accurate.

They aren't perfect, but mammograms are still the best way to find breast cancer early.

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: “Breast Density and Your Mammogram Report.”

Breastcancer.org: “Having Dense Breasts.”

Radiological Society of North America: “Dense Breasts.”

American College of Radiology: “Breast Density; Breast Cancer Screening.”

National Cancer Institute: “Understanding Breast Changes: A Health Guide for Women.”

Joshi, S. October 2013. Insights into Imaging,

Freer, P. March-April 2015. Radiographics,

Karla Kerlikowske, K. May 2015. Annals of Internal Medicine,

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on March 08, 2018

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: “Breast Density and Your Mammogram Report.”

Breastcancer.org: “Having Dense Breasts.”

Radiological Society of North America: “Dense Breasts.”

American College of Radiology: “Breast Density; Breast Cancer Screening.”

National Cancer Institute: “Understanding Breast Changes: A Health Guide for Women.”

Joshi, S. October 2013. Insights into Imaging,

Freer, P. March-April 2015. Radiographics,

Karla Kerlikowske, K. May 2015. Annals of Internal Medicine,

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on March 08, 2018

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