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How do I interpret the genetic test results for breast cancer?

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A negative means that the test found no breast cancer gene mutation. If genetic testing previously identified a mutation in your family, then a negative test means you do not carry your family’s specific mutation. So your chances of getting breast cancer is the same as someone in the general population who has a family history of breast cancer. If a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation has not been previously found in your family, you should look at your negative result with caution. There is still a chance that you may have a higher risk for breast cancer from potential mutations in genes other than those we can test for today.

A positive test result means you have a mutation known to raise the risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Knowing your cancer risk may help guide important health care decisions for you and your family.

SOURCE:
National Breast Cancer Coalition.

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on October 9, 2019

SOURCE:
National Breast Cancer Coalition.

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on October 9, 2019

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Should I be tested for genetic mutations of breast cancer?

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