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How is lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) treated?

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Some women with lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) won’t need immediate treatment with surgery or medicines. Instead, the doctor may recommend keeping a close eye on your condition. That means regular breast self-exams, office visits, and routine mammograms or other tests such as MRIs.

If you have a family history of breast cancer and are at an increased risk, your doctor may discuss the use of medications such as anastrozole (Arimidex), exemestane (Aromasin), raloxifene (Evista), or tamoxifen (Nolvadex). These drugs may lower the chance that you’ll develop invasive breast cancer.

SOURCES:

Breastcancer.org: “Lobular carcinoma in situ;” “Invasive lobular carcinoma;” ”Bone Scans;” “LCIS and Breast Cancer Risk;” ”Treatments for LCIS;” “Test for Diagnosing ILC;” and “Systemic Treatments for ILC: Chemotherapy, Hormonal Therapy, Targeted Therapies.”

Breast Cancer Network of Strength: “Lobular carcinoma in situ” and “Infiltrating lobular carcinoma.”

National Cancer Institute: “Lobular carcinoma in situ.”

American Cancer Society: “What is breast cancer?” and "Special Section: Breast Carcinoma in Situ."

College of American Pathologists: “Lobular carcinoma in situ“ and "Invasive lobular carcinoma.”

MedlinePlus: “Tamoxifen.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on March 17, 2019

SOURCES:

Breastcancer.org: “Lobular carcinoma in situ;” “Invasive lobular carcinoma;” ”Bone Scans;” “LCIS and Breast Cancer Risk;” ”Treatments for LCIS;” “Test for Diagnosing ILC;” and “Systemic Treatments for ILC: Chemotherapy, Hormonal Therapy, Targeted Therapies.”

Breast Cancer Network of Strength: “Lobular carcinoma in situ” and “Infiltrating lobular carcinoma.”

National Cancer Institute: “Lobular carcinoma in situ.”

American Cancer Society: “What is breast cancer?” and "Special Section: Breast Carcinoma in Situ."

College of American Pathologists: “Lobular carcinoma in situ“ and "Invasive lobular carcinoma.”

MedlinePlus: “Tamoxifen.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on March 17, 2019

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What surgeries can treat lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS)?

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