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What are the types of invasive breast cancer?

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Two types account for about 90% of invasive breast cancer.

  • Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). This is the most common type, making up about 80%. With IDC, cancer cells start in a milk duct, break through the walls, and invade breast tissue. It can remain localized, which means it stays near the site where the tumor started -- or cancer cells may spread anywhere in the body.
  • Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC). This type accounts for about 10% of invasive breast cancers. ILC starts in the lobules or milk glands and then spreads. With ILC, most women feel a thickening instead of a lump in their breast. Some women may have a combination of both or a different type of invasive breast cancer.

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "What is Breast Cancer?"

BreastCancer.org: "ILC -- Invasive Lobular Carcinoma" and “Treatment for DCIS.”

National Institute of Health: "Breast Cancer: Reference Summary."

Breast Cancer Treatments of America: “Invasive breast cancer risk factors.”

National Cancer Institute: “Breast Cancer Risk in American Women.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on August 01, 2017

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "What is Breast Cancer?"

BreastCancer.org: "ILC -- Invasive Lobular Carcinoma" and “Treatment for DCIS.”

National Institute of Health: "Breast Cancer: Reference Summary."

Breast Cancer Treatments of America: “Invasive breast cancer risk factors.”

National Cancer Institute: “Breast Cancer Risk in American Women.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on August 01, 2017

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What are the signs of invasive breast cancer?

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