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What situation in breast cancer chemotherapy is considered an emergency?

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Your doctor and the chemotherapy nurse will let you know what situations would be considered an emergency. But if you have any of the following warning signs, tell your doctor immediately:

  • A temperature greater than 100.4 F
  • Any fever and chills
  • New mouth sores or patches, a swollen tongue, or bleeding gums
  • A dry, burning, scratchy, or swollen throat
  • A cough that makes mucus
  • Needing to urinate more, burning when you urinate, or blood in your urine
  • Heartburn, nausea, vomiting, constipation, or diarrhea that lasts longer than two or three days
  • Blood in your stools

SOURCES:

The Cleveland Clinic.

Taussig Cancer Center.

Physician's Daily Reference.

American Cancer Society: “Targeted therapy for breast cancer;” “Chemotherapy for breast cancer;” and “Central Venous Catheters.”

National Cancer Institute.

BreastCancer.org: “Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on July 15, 2017

SOURCES:

The Cleveland Clinic.

Taussig Cancer Center.

Physician's Daily Reference.

American Cancer Society: “Targeted therapy for breast cancer;” “Chemotherapy for breast cancer;” and “Central Venous Catheters.”

National Cancer Institute.

BreastCancer.org: “Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on July 15, 2017

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How common is fatigue with breast cancer?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

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