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When is hormone therapy recommended to treat stage II breast cancer?

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Hormone therapy after surgery may help women who have hormone receptor-positive cancer. That means the cancer needs hormones to grow. Medicines can prevent the tumor from getting the hormones. These drugs include tamoxifen for all women, and anastrozole (Arimidex), exemestane (Aromasin), and letrozole (Femara) for postmenopausal women.

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: “How is Breast Cancer Staged?” ”Breast cancer survival rates, by stage,” “Questions about chemotherapy,” “Targeted therapy for breast cancer.”

MedlinePlus: “Tamoxifen.”

National Comprehensive Cancer Network: "Guidelines for Patients."

National Breast Cancer Foundation: “Stage 2.”

National Cancer Institute: "Breast Cancer PDQ: Treatment, Health Professional Version," "Breast Cancer PDQ: Treatment, Patient Version," "Understanding Breast Cancer: A Guide for Patients," "What You Need to Know about Breast Cancer," “Adjuvant and Neoadjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on March 25, 2019

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: “How is Breast Cancer Staged?” ”Breast cancer survival rates, by stage,” “Questions about chemotherapy,” “Targeted therapy for breast cancer.”

MedlinePlus: “Tamoxifen.”

National Comprehensive Cancer Network: "Guidelines for Patients."

National Breast Cancer Foundation: “Stage 2.”

National Cancer Institute: "Breast Cancer PDQ: Treatment, Health Professional Version," "Breast Cancer PDQ: Treatment, Patient Version," "Understanding Breast Cancer: A Guide for Patients," "What You Need to Know about Breast Cancer," “Adjuvant and Neoadjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on March 25, 2019

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If I haven't reached menopause should I get my ovaries removed to help treat my stage II breast cancer?

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