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Which tests may doctors use to diagnose invasive lobular carcinoma?

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Invasive lobular carcinoma spreads. Therefore, your doctor may recommend additional tests to search for cancer in other parts of your body. These tests may include:

  • A computerized tomography (CT) scan. It's a powerful X-ray that makes detailed pictures inside your body.
  • A positron emission tomography (PET) scan. Used together with a CT scan, this test can help find cancer in lymph nodes and other areas.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It uses strong magnets and radio waves to make pictures of the breast and other structures inside your body.
  • Bone scan. A radioactive substance called a tracer is injected into your arm, and pictures are taken to find out if cancer may have traveled to your bones.
  • Chest X-ray: It uses radiation in low doses to make images of structures inside your chest. Your doctor will also take samples from your lymph nodes in the armpits to check for cancer. This is called axillary lymph node dissection. The results of your exams will determine the stage of your breast cancer and your best treatment options.

SOURCES:

Breastcancer.org: “Lobular carcinoma in situ;” “Invasive lobular carcinoma;” ”Bone Scans;” “LCIS and Breast Cancer Risk;” ”Treatments for LCIS;” “Test for Diagnosing ILC;” and “Systemic Treatments for ILC: Chemotherapy, Hormonal Therapy, Targeted Therapies.”

Breast Cancer Network of Strength: “Lobular carcinoma in situ” and “Infiltrating lobular carcinoma.”

National Cancer Institute: “Lobular carcinoma in situ.”

American Cancer Society: “What is breast cancer?” and "Special Section: Breast Carcinoma in Situ."

College of American Pathologists: “Lobular carcinoma in situ“ and "Invasive lobular carcinoma.”

MedlinePlus: “Tamoxifen.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on March 17, 2019

SOURCES:

Breastcancer.org: “Lobular carcinoma in situ;” “Invasive lobular carcinoma;” ”Bone Scans;” “LCIS and Breast Cancer Risk;” ”Treatments for LCIS;” “Test for Diagnosing ILC;” and “Systemic Treatments for ILC: Chemotherapy, Hormonal Therapy, Targeted Therapies.”

Breast Cancer Network of Strength: “Lobular carcinoma in situ” and “Infiltrating lobular carcinoma.”

National Cancer Institute: “Lobular carcinoma in situ.”

American Cancer Society: “What is breast cancer?” and "Special Section: Breast Carcinoma in Situ."

College of American Pathologists: “Lobular carcinoma in situ“ and "Invasive lobular carcinoma.”

MedlinePlus: “Tamoxifen.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on March 17, 2019

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How is invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) treated?

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