PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

How is meningioma treated?

ANSWER

If the tumor is not causing any symptoms, observation is often recommended. Regular brain scans will be performed to determine if the tumor is growing. If the tumor's growth threatens to cause problems or if symptoms begin to develop, surgery may be necessary. If surgery is required, a craniotomy will typically be performed. The procedure involves removing a piece of bone from the skull. This gives the surgeon access to the affected portion of the brain. The surgeon then removes the tumor -- or as much of it as possible. The bone that was removed at the start of the procedure is then replaced. The location of the meningioma will determine how accessible it is to the surgeon. If it can't be reached via surgery, radiation therapy may be used. Radiation can shrink the tumor or help prevent it from growing any larger. Radiation can also be used to kill cancer cells if the tumor is malignant. It may also be used on the parts of a tumor the surgeon was unable to remove.

From: Meningioma WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Cedars-Sinai: "Meningiomas Brain Tumors."

Brigham and Women's Hospital: "Facts about Meningiomas."

Johns Hopkins Medicine web site: "Grades of Meningioma," "Stereotactic Radiosurgery," "What Is a Meningioma?" "Types of Meningioma," "Diagnosis of Meningioma," "Treatment of Meningioma."

American Academy of Neurological Surgeons: "Meningiomas."

Medscape: "Pathophysiology."

UCLA Health System web site: "What Is a Meningioma?"

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on July 14, 2017

SOURCES:

Cedars-Sinai: "Meningiomas Brain Tumors."

Brigham and Women's Hospital: "Facts about Meningiomas."

Johns Hopkins Medicine web site: "Grades of Meningioma," "Stereotactic Radiosurgery," "What Is a Meningioma?" "Types of Meningioma," "Diagnosis of Meningioma," "Treatment of Meningioma."

American Academy of Neurological Surgeons: "Meningiomas."

Medscape: "Pathophysiology."

UCLA Health System web site: "What Is a Meningioma?"

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on July 14, 2017

NEXT QUESTION:

Where does glioblastoma form in the brain?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: