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What are the causes and risks factors of meningioma?

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The causes of meningioma are not well understood. However, there are two known risk factors:

Previous injury may also be a risk factor, but a recent study failed to confirm this. Meningiomas have been found in places where skull fractures have occurred. They've also been found in places where the surrounding membrane has been scarred. Some research suggests a link between meningiomas and the hormone progesterone. Middle-aged women are more than twice as likely as men to develop a meningioma. Most meningiomas occur between the ages of 30 and 70. They are rare in children.

  • Exposure to radiation
  • Neurofibromatosis type 2, a genetic disorder

From: Meningioma WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Cedars-Sinai: "Meningiomas Brain Tumors."

Brigham and Women's Hospital: "Facts about Meningiomas."

Johns Hopkins Medicine web site: "Grades of Meningioma," "Stereotactic Radiosurgery," "What Is a Meningioma?" "Types of Meningioma," "Diagnosis of Meningioma," "Treatment of Meningioma."

American Academy of Neurological Surgeons: "Meningiomas."

Medscape: "Pathophysiology."

UCLA Health System web site: "What Is a Meningioma?"

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on July 14, 2017

SOURCES:

Cedars-Sinai: "Meningiomas Brain Tumors."

Brigham and Women's Hospital: "Facts about Meningiomas."

Johns Hopkins Medicine web site: "Grades of Meningioma," "Stereotactic Radiosurgery," "What Is a Meningioma?" "Types of Meningioma," "Diagnosis of Meningioma," "Treatment of Meningioma."

American Academy of Neurological Surgeons: "Meningiomas."

Medscape: "Pathophysiology."

UCLA Health System web site: "What Is a Meningioma?"

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on July 14, 2017

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