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How is a Pap test done?

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Your gynecologist will do a Pap test during your routine pelvic exam. It’s quick and painless. You lie on an exam table and your doctor will use a speculum to keep your vagina open. It also lets her see your cervix. Next, she’ll use a small brush to swab some cells from your cervix. The cells are sent a lab where they’re checked for signs of cancer. 

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "How is cervical cancer diagnosed?" "How is cervical cancer staged?" "HPV and HPV Testing." "Signs and Symptoms of Cervical Cancer."

CDC: "What Should I Know About Screening?"

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: "Cervical cone biopsy."

MD Anderson Cancer Center: "Cervical Cancer Diagnosis."

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: "Colposcopy."

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: "Pap test."

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force: "Cervical Cancer: Screening."

Reviewed by Lisa Bernstein on October 21, 2018

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "How is cervical cancer diagnosed?" "How is cervical cancer staged?" "HPV and HPV Testing." "Signs and Symptoms of Cervical Cancer."

CDC: "What Should I Know About Screening?"

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: "Cervical cone biopsy."

MD Anderson Cancer Center: "Cervical Cancer Diagnosis."

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: "Colposcopy."

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: "Pap test."

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force: "Cervical Cancer: Screening."

Reviewed by Lisa Bernstein on October 21, 2018

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How often should women be screened for HPV?

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