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How does a stem cell transplant work for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

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Before the transplant, you'll likely need to get treated with high doses of chemo for a week or two. You may have nausea and mouth sores.

When the high-dose chemo is done, you'll start the transplant. The new stem cells are given to you through an IV. You won't feel any pain from this, and you're awake while it’s happening.

It could take 2 to 6 weeks for the stem cells to multiply and start making new blood cells. You may be in the hospital for this, or at the very least, you'll get checked by your transplant team daily.

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Leukemia -- Acute Lymphocytic."

Bethematch.org: "Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)."

Cleveland Clinic: "Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia."

Medscape: "Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia."

National Cancer Institute: "B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia," "General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia," "Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)," "Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects."

Cancer Care.org: "Understanding and Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on June 27, 2018

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Leukemia -- Acute Lymphocytic."

Bethematch.org: "Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)."

Cleveland Clinic: "Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia."

Medscape: "Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia."

National Cancer Institute: "B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia," "General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia," "Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)," "Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects."

Cancer Care.org: "Understanding and Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on June 27, 2018

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How does targeted therapy help treat B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

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