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How does targeted therapy help treat B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

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This treatment uses drugs that go after specific parts of cancer cells. You often get the drugs in this type of therapy every day in pill form. They usually have fewer severe side effects than chemotherapy. This treatment doesn't work for everyone, but it puts a lot of people into remission and may help keep the cancer from coming back.

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Leukemia -- Acute Lymphocytic."

Bethematch.org: "Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)."

Cleveland Clinic: "Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia."

Medscape: "Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia."

National Cancer Institute: "B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia," "General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia," "Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)," "Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects."

Cancer Care.org: "Understanding and Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on June 27, 2018

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Leukemia -- Acute Lymphocytic."

Bethematch.org: "Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)."

Cleveland Clinic: "Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia."

Medscape: "Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia."

National Cancer Institute: "B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia," "General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia," "Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)," "Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects."

Cancer Care.org: "Understanding and Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on June 27, 2018

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How does chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy help in treating B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

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