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What should I expect after treatment of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

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It's likely that your treatment for B-cell ALL will take a number of years. After your treatment is over, you'll have regular visits to your doctor so she can check to make sure your cancer hasn't returned. Your doctor will also check for any lingering side effects of your therapy.

For some people, treatment makes the cancer go away. For others, the cancer may not go away completely, or it may return. If that's the case, you may need regular treatment with chemotherapy or other drugs to keep it in check for as long as possible.

It's possible that treatment to fight B-cell ALL may stop working. If that happens, you may want to focus on making sure you're as comfortable as possible, known as palliative care. You may not be able to control your cancer, but you can control choices about how you'll live your life.

You don't have to face things alone. Consider joining a support group, where you can you share your feelings with others who understand what it's like.

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Leukemia -- Acute Lymphocytic."

Bethematch.org: "Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)."

Cleveland Clinic: "Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia."

Medscape: "Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia."

National Cancer Institute: "B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia," "General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia," "Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)," "Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects."

Cancer Care.org: "Understanding and Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on June 27, 2018

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Leukemia -- Acute Lymphocytic."

Bethematch.org: "Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)."

Cleveland Clinic: "Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia."

Medscape: "Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia."

National Cancer Institute: "B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia," "General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia," "Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)," "Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects."

Cancer Care.org: "Understanding and Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on June 27, 2018

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What is B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

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